Twitter Facebook Vimeo

Student work to promote artists on the underground

2 min, 29 sec read
14:30 PM | 8 October 2014
by Jim Compton-hall
   •       •   
Become an FR Writer

We spoke to Miami Ad School students behind this multi-award winning piece of work.

Frank Garcia, Guila Magaldi and German Rivera Hudders, students from New York's branch of Miami Ad School, recently produced this piece for Pandora (a free online music/radio service that has annoyingly been unavailable in the UK ever since just after I got addicted to it... sigh). 

We caught up with the students behind this piece to find out more about what inspired this idea.

How did you think of the idea?

As creative people we are always thinking of stuff. It could be advertising, it could be a gadget, a show, or just what if the world stopped spinning. One of the topics we kept coming back to was the wasted talent in the subways. And we started concepting on our own around that. Then, as if serendipity was all too real, we got a brief that was as simple as it was ambitious – we were asked to help a brand save one aspect of the arts. And what we chose to save was subway musicians.

More stories

  1. The wug life of a linguist

    Linguistic Graduate, Valerie Tan, delves into what life is like as a linguist in and out of university.

  2. Let your voice ‘BeHeard’ with VocaliD

    Ad students created a campaign ‘BeHeard’ to help create unique vocal personas for mute people.

  3. Lazy CVs destroy job seekers’ chances of landing dream jobs

    Job seekers aren’t landing jobs because they don’t spend enough time on their CV.

  4. Distractions and focus part 2

    Donald Fogarty, FutureRising’s Co-Founder, finishes his advice on staying focused on your role in the creative industries to reach your potential.

  5. How to doodle online

    Creative company, HAWRAF, does all things creative and they have a quirky website to go with their ideas.

  6. Is journalistic objectivity possible in today’s society?

    Journalism graduate, Tijen Butler, debates whether journalistic objectivity is possible in the western news environment, with the 24-hour news cycle.

×