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Twitter and Facebook star in new Game of Thrones title sequence

56 sec read
10:24 AM | 7 April 2014
by Jim Compton-hall
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The social media channels replace the warring houses of Westeros in Hootsuite's A Game of Social Thrones.

To celebrate today’s premiere of season 4 of Game of Thrones, Hootsuite has released this epic video. Using the beloved Game of Thrones title sequence, Facebook, Twitter, Linkedin and Google+ replace the various houses and landmarks of Westeros. You’ll also see a few smaller social networks popping up throughout. Can you spot all of them?

Hootsuite are successfully capitalising on the hype and excitement for the Game Of Thrones show. What’s more, it doesn’t feel forced. Often when you see brands trying to tap into a TV show, movie or other piece of popular culture, it just doesn’t quite work. They first choose something popular and then try to mould it, squash it, stretch it and take a hammer to it until it fits. But the warring houses of Westeros feel like a great metaphor for the various social media channels.

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