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Sony's QX100 captures the life in Northlandz

1 min, 4 sec read
9:51 AM | 21 March 2014
by Jim Compton-hall
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Sony took their QX100 lens to Northlandz to capture a life and energy that other cameras are just unable to achieve.  

Recently Sony visited Northlandz, an amazing model train wonderland, in order to promote their QX100 smart lens, a super high quality, wireless lens for your smartphone. You can place the lens anywhere and control the shot and take the photo from your phone. 

So what better way to promote this than showing a photographer grab amazing shots that would just be impossible to get at with a regular camera? Enter Northlandz, a huge, 52,000 square feet model utopia created by Bruce Zaccagino in New Jersey.

Northlandz attracts thousands of visitors and is sometimes referred to as a wonder of the world. Sony's QX100 managed to capture the life and energy of Northlandz in a way that other photographers and cameras haven't been able to do. What a great way to promote a smart lens?

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