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HTC should reposition its brand

3 min, 9 sec read
14:48 PM | 6 March 2012

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For the past two years HTC’s meteoric rise has coincided with the rise of Android. Their excellently designed phones brought them to the top of the heap amongst Android manufacturers and proved popular with early adopters.

For the past two years HTC’s meteoric rise has coincided with the rise of Android. Their excellently designed phones brought them to the top of the heap amongst Android manufacturers and proved popular with early adopters. Now, the markets have matured in HTC’s core markets of Europe and North America and HTC is struggling. Growth has come to a halt and their share price has dropped 30% in the last month alone. Phones are converging in terms of specs and features. We are no longer seeing huge technological and design advantages from one phone to another (with respect to the flagship phones of the top three brands: Apple, Samsung, and HTC). Differentiation in this market is increasingly going to be based on brand rather than product. This is the reason for HTCs recent decline. It is in the area of branding that HTC struggles vis-à-vis its competitors. 

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