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Book review: Advertising for People Who Don't Like Advertising

1 min, 45 sec read
11:53 AM | 11 February 2014

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Check out a book by ad agency KesselsKramer that explores the past, present and future of the advertising industry.

What's it about? 

The advertising world is made up of chaotic, out-there ideas and the odd tipsy lunch meetings with clients. KesselsKrammer has always been known to go against the grain when it comes to traditional advertising agency values.  This book is a true and realistic look at the past of advertising and it's future. Exploring alternate views from advertising and design masters such as Alex Bogusky, Stefan Sagmeister, and Steve Henry to name a few. 

Is it any good? 

Yes. This book gives you detailed accounts of how KesselsKrammer grew as an agency and what they did differently compared to the rest. It demonstrates how digital came to life and how they have embraced it's creativity. With each person present in the book, they give a different angle on their experiences as designers, photographers, creatives, etc, and how they fitted into the advertising world.

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