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Hanna Stenwall and Joyce Kremer, creative team

5 min, 14 sec read
11:45 AM | 22 October 2014
by Adam Oldfield
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Stenwall & Kremer, a junior creative team formed of Hanna Stenwall and Joyce Kremer. Recently joined forces. Trying to get CDs to invite them for book crits and coffee.

"Advertising is a place for all the leftovers and misfits"

WHAT MADE YOU WANT TO WORK IN CREATIVE ADVERTISING?

Advertising is a place for all the leftovers and misfits. For everyone with "restless brain syndrome". For everyone too commercial for art, but artsy enough to create. For all obsessive, slightly psychotic people chasing the thrill of cracking the nut. So it’s not that odd we ended up here.

HOW DID YOU COME TO MEET EACH OTHER?

Adam at JWT played cupid for us. Joyce was on a placement there before her and her partner decided to split up. Hanna happened to email Adam as well, and there it was. A match made in heaven. If you read this, Adam, we owe you a beer.

HANNA, HOW COME YOU DECIDED TO STUDY AT BERGHS AND WHAT DID YOU LEARN MOST FROM YOUR TIME THERE?

I remember seeing an ad for Diesel, thinking “I wanna do THAT”. And apparently you can study advertising. At Berghs we weren’t taught the conventional way; we had lectures with comedians, CEO’s, psychologists, authors and inventors because everything and everyone communicates. I believe in surrounding yourself with old souls and proven wisdom, to learn from reality instead of a text book. Basically, I paid a lot of money to meet a lot of interesting people.

JOYCE, WHAT INTERESTED YOU ABOUT STUDYING IN ENGLAND AT LINCOLN AND FALMOUTH?

I studied graphic design in the Netherlands and decided I wanted to focus on the concept behind the execution. The uni in the Netherlands has an exchange program with Lincoln so I could do the BA as a shortened version. Plus I wanted to learn how to advertise in English. I mean, I’m already fluent in Dutch. After graduating from Lincoln I took a year out, and decided to find a partner while doing a Masters course. I got a scholarship, which made it cheaper than living in London and trying to find a partner while juggling a bar job. Which is ironic because that is exactly what I did before I met Hanna.

ALSO, HANNA, YOU MADE THE MOVE OVER FROM SWEDEN, WHAT’S IT LIKE WORKING HERE IN ADVERTISING COMPARED TO BACK HOME?

I got the opportunity to go to London for a placement, and I took it. The world is kind of small anyway, yet the UK offers so much more for a rookie like myself. There are a lot of amazing agencies back in Sweden, but here I’m in a position where I can explore more agencies and fail harder. Also, talking English all day feels like I’m living the Hollywood version of my future biography in advance.

JOYCE, FROM YOUR TIME AT FABULA, WHAT WAS THE BEST HIGHLIGHT?

Fabula is a great place to learn. It was the first placement for me and my old partner. We got thrown straight into the deep end: a pitch. Fabula is a very small agency, so we got to work closely with Yan and Luke who are the ECD’s. Even though it was a short placement, we learned so much. And the fact that the agency is on a barge must be added to the highlights as well. Who else can say they have an agency on a barge in the canals of London?

"Your book might feel like an awkward love child created behind the scenes at X factor"

HOW DO YOU GO ABOUT GETTING A PLACEMENT OR AN INTERNSHIP?

There is no point in asking just anyone for a book crit. We want to learn from people who in our eyes have done some amazing work. Going on book crits is an amazing opportunity to meet some brilliant people in the industry. And even though your book might feel like an awkward love child created behind the scenes at X factor, you need to get it out there. For us, it’s all about being yourself, showing passion and about presenting yourself to them at the right time. Placements are pretty hard to get, especially if you are a single creative. We both tried getting one on our own. But unfortunately it doesn’t work that way in London.

WHAT CREATIVE WORK MOST INSPIRES YOU BOTH?

God knows. What’s inspiring? It could be anything and everything. Today it might be the homeless guy in the corner with a funny note. Tomorrow it might be a post on an art blog. That’s the thing. You need to be a creative sponge and challenge yourself to do something new everyday. Or at least every month.

IF YOU HAD AN EXTRA DAY EACH WEEK WHAT WOULD YOU EACH DO WITH THAT TIME?

Someone once said a work week should be 80 percent about hard work and 20 percent of crazy monkey time. But that’s quite hard when you’re juggling a placement, a part time job and working on your book. So maybe that extra day should be all about our inner monkey. You need to rest from work to do good work – that way champagne in Cannes may not be that far away. 

ARE THERE ANY PROJECTS YOU WANT TO EXPLORE IN THE FUTURE?

Wouldn’t it be cool to win the Nobel Peace Prize for saving humanity from the growing polarisation the world is facing right now. Using nothing but advertising at its best? We can sell bread and butter 'til we die, but we've got to dream big, right? 

"Don’t get down by things that scare the cr­ap out of you"

WHAT ONE PIECE OF ADVICE WOULD YOU PASS BACK TO YOUR YOUNGER SELVES?

You may think that the worst thing that can happen is dying. But in fact, the worst thing is to run a bus filled with kids into a brick wall. And that will most certainly not happen. We’re still only doing advertising, right? So don’t get down by things that scare the cr­ap out of you. Just do it, and do it again and again and again until you’re comfortable with something you were scared of to begin with.

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